November is the month many people start transitioning into the Holiday season. We get increasingly busy planning family get togethers, our gift list has started and our general consumption is slowly increasing. Though this is a busy and joyous time for many, this is also the time where some are in need of basic necessities that many of us take for granted. I saw this first hand at the first real estate brokerage I was with, where not only do many agents get sucked into the numbers game and sales culture, but envy and competition are actually emphasized and encouraged. Sales numbers and agent earnings are the primary focal point. Of course around the holiday's a few agents may rally around Toys for Tots or some other quality non-profit but it feels like a pretty token, once-a-year gesture when the rest of the time is inward focused on me, me, me and how much more money can I make then the other agents in my office or how I rank in my market....

When I starting my own brokerage, I made a promise to myself and the community to keep giving back & community involvement central in our day-to-day activities of helping clients. This value has brought us community partnerships, volunteer opportunities and a deeper knowledge of issues and topics that happen right in our community that many are not fully aware of.

My agents and I hold a Quarterly Sea-Town Volunteer day that bring us the opportunity of gaining knowledge of our community and the issue impacting it, as well as an opportunity to make a difference. Our most recent volunteer day was with West Side Baby, who we have cultivated a partnership with and have collaborated together for previous volunteer events. WestSide Baby is a nonprofit organization that collects previously owned items for children and babies and distributes them free of charge to King County families in need. Their main mission is to keep children “Safe, Warm and Dry”. All of our volunteers from agents, friends and family came together and sorted out and organized children’s clothing while becoming more aware on how many families in the King County area are struggling to meet their basic needs.